Home » Enterprise Java » Logback

Logback

Logback OutputStreamAppender Example

This article discusses the OutputStreamAppender of logback, a logging framework for the Java application. 1. Introduction to Logback and Appender Logback is designed to be the successor for Log4j. It has been developed by the same development community. These are some of the advantages logback has over log4j Faster implementation – ~10x faster on some critical areas Automatic Reloading of ...

Read More »

Logback Kafka Appender Example

This article discusses Kafka as a logging destination for a Java application. In this tutorial, We will use logback as the logging framework. 1. Logback Kafka Appender – Introduction Logback is designed to be the successor for Log4j. It has been developed by the same development community. These are some of the advantages logback has over log4j Faster implementation – ...

Read More »

Logback Change Log Level at Runtime Example

1. Introduction In this post, we feature a comprehensive Example on Logback Change Log Level. Logback is one of the most widely used logging frameworks in the Java community. Most applications set the logger level to INFO in the production environment, but sometimes we need more detailed logging messages to troubleshoot issues and would like to change the logger lever at runtime. ...

Read More »

Logback AsyncAppender Example

1. Introduction In this post, we feature a comprehensive Example on Logback AsyncAppender. Most of the Java applications rely on logging messages to identify and troubleshoot problems. Logback is one of the most widely used logging frameworks in the Java community. Logback includes three classes: Logger, Appender, and Layout. Logback appenders are responsible for outputting logging events to the destination. It provides ...

Read More »

Logback vs Log4j Example

In this post, we feature a comprehensive Example on Logback vs Log4j. Logback and Log4j are the most widely used logging frameworks in the Java community. In this tutorial, I will demonstrate how to log the messages in Java applications with both Logback and Log4j. Table Of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Technologies Used 3. Maven Java Application 3.1 Dependencies 3.2 ...

Read More »

Logback Tutorial for Beginners

In this post, we feature a comprehensive Logback Tutorial. Logback is one of the most widely used logging frameworks in the Java community. It provides more options for configuration and more flexibility in archiving old log files. In this tutorial, I will demonstrate its three key components: Logger, Appender, and Layout. Table Of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Technologies Used 3. Spring ...

Read More »

Logback Appender Example

In this example we are going to see some capabilities from logback logging framework. Logback is intended as a successor to the popular log4j project, picking up where log4j leaves off. We are going to see an example of a project that uses logback as logging framework. For this example we use the following technologies: MAC OSX Eclipse Mars.1 Maven3 ...

Read More »

Logback RollingFileAppender Example

In this example, we will begin by explaining the Logback RollingFileAppender and then move on to how to get RollingFileAppender running on simple examples. Logback is a modern, fast and flexible logging framework. The RollingFileAppender in the Logback is one of the most using Appender in the enterprise world. It extends the FileAppender with the capability to rollover log files. ...

Read More »

Logback Encoder Example

In this example, we are going to discuss the Encoders in the Logback. In a few words, Encoders are responsible to convert the events into byte array. Logback, as a successor of the popular Log4j project, is designed to be the next generation logging framework with many advantages over other logging frameworks. If you don’t have overall knowledge about the ...

Read More »

Logback Mapped Diagnostic Contexts (MDC) Example

In the client-server or web applications, log statements that belong to distinct client’s request are mixed and it is hard to trace them separately. The Mapped Diagnostic Context ( MDC ) in the Logback is a great way to differentiate them. In this post, we will explain the MDC and show you who to use it in the Logback. Logback ...

Read More »