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Author Archives: Ilias Tsagklis

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Ilias is a software developer turned online entrepreneur. He is co-founder and Executive Editor at Java Code Geeks.

Compare integers

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With this example we are going to demonstrate how to compare integers. The comparation between two integers can be performed using the greater than and less than symbols. In short, to compare two integers i1 and i2 you should: Check if i1 is greater than i2 in an if statement. If it is true, that means that i1 is greater ...

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Simple if statement

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In this example we shall show you how to use a simple if statement. The if-else statement is the most basic of all the control flow statements. It tells your program to execute a certain section of code only if a particular expression evaluates to true. To use a simple if statement one should perform the following steps: Create a new boolean ...

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try/catch/finally InputStream example

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This is an example of an InputStream in a try/catch/finally statement. Using try/catch/finally statement to create an InputStream implies that you should: Create an InputStream and initialize it to null. Open a try statement and initialize the InputStream to a FileInputStream, by opening a connection to an actual file. Include the catch statement to catch any IOExceptions thrown while trying ...

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Checked and Unchecked Exceptions example

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In this example we shall show you how to use a checked and an unchecked exception. A checked exception is anything that is a subclass of Exception, except for RuntimeException and its subclasses. In order to use a checked and an unchecked exception we have followed the steps below: We have created a method, void checkSize(String fileName) that creates a ...

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long

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With this example we are going to demonstrate how to use a long type in Java. The long data type is a 64-bit signed two’s complement integer. It has a minimum value of -9,223,372,036,854,775,808 and a maximum value of 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 (inclusive). Use this data type when you need a range of values wider than those provided by int. In short, ...

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float

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In this example we shall show you how to use a float type in Java. The float data type is a single-precision 32-bit IEEE 754 floating point. Use a float (instead of double) if you need to save memory in large arrays of floating point numbers. This data type should never be used for precise values, such as currency. For that, ...

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char

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This is an example of how to use a char type in Java. The char data type is a single 16-bit Unicode character. It has a minimum value of ‘\u0000’ (or 0) and a maximum value of ‘\uffff’ (or 65,535 inclusive). In order to create variable of char type you should type the char keyword in a variable. Let’s take ...

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boolean

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With this example we are going to demonstrate how to use a boolean type in Java. The boolean data type has only two possible values: true and false. Use this data type for simple flags that track true/false conditions. This data type represents one bit of information, but its “size” isn’t something that’s precisely defined. In short, to create variable ...

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Each Enum Instance a different sub-class

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In this example we shall show you how to have each enum instance represent a different sub-class. To make each enum instance represent a different sub-class one should perform the following steps: Create an enum with different enum constants. Give each enum constant a different behavior for some method. Declare the method abstract in the enum type and override it with ...

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Enum for Singleton and Utility class

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enum Singleton { INSTANCE; } enum Utility { ; // no instances } Related Article: Java Secret: Using an enum to build a State machine Reference: Java Secret: Using an enum to build a State machine from our JCG partner Peter Lawrey at the Vanilla Java blog

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